Why Black Lives Matter to White People

The nation dodged a bullet this week; Well, everyone but the Dallas police…  The Dallas police massacre could’ve been the tipping point where the tension between blacks and whites evolved into armed rebellion.   It was a relief to hear President Obama’s comments on Saturday.  That was the first time I heard one of our nations “leaders”‘ address the continuing tension between blacks and the establishment and provide some perspective on changing course away from armed rebellion instead of using the situation to further personal agendas.

Even if the Dallas police massacre didn’t trigger a conflagration of armed violence,  there will be plenty of opportunities to do so as protests increase & tensions rise.  Protestors carried long guns (rifles & shotguns) in marches on Saturday.

I thank the republicans in congress for making this situation not only possible but likely to escalate.  Their actions (or inactions) have pushed the situation to this prescipice:  Their adament refusal to do anything about gun control have armed the protesters.  Doing nothing in recent weeks except a political witch hunt of Hillary Clinton leaves there no establishment leadership to respond to citizen’s concerns, both black & white, and demonstrates to blacks that their lives are no concern of theirs.

Many may say that this isn’t that big a deal.  Eventually everyone will give up their protests & return to their daily lives.  I’m sure the same was said in the colonies in the 1760’s.  It’s not easy to recognize a rebellion until it’s too late to avoid it. Pray that we can learn that lesson from previous rebellions & respond in time to avoid this one.  Because armed rebellion affects everyone – even folks living in their nice safe homes in gated communities.  they won’t have to turn on the TV to see innocent bystanders getting shot and trampled while protesters & establishment forces battle it out.

The difference between courage & desperation

This week while chatting with my therapist, she repeatedly tried to compliment my courage in facing several challenges. But she & I had different perspectives of the same situations. Where she saw courage, I knew it was only desperation.   I finally got my point across using the classic 80’s movie “Officer and a Gentleman” where Richard Gere’s character is being harassed by his drill instructor to drop out. He breaks down, crying out “I’ve got no place else to go.  This is it!”  I’ve felt that way several times since the stroke- I have to be able to eat. I have to get up & stand on my own.  I have to be able to walk around the house.  I have to be able to put my brace & shoes on.  I have no place else to go.  This is it!  So I have to do whatever’s necessary to be able to do these things.  It’s not a matter of courage but of desperation.  The alternative is too scary to even think about.