Why Black Lives Matter to White People

The nation dodged a bullet this week; Well, everyone but the Dallas police…  The Dallas police massacre could’ve been the tipping point where the tension between blacks and whites evolved into armed rebellion.   It was a relief to hear President Obama’s comments on Saturday.  That was the first time I heard one of our nations “leaders”‘ address the continuing tension between blacks and the establishment and provide some perspective on changing course away from armed rebellion instead of using the situation to further personal agendas.

Even if the Dallas police massacre didn’t trigger a conflagration of armed violence,  there will be plenty of opportunities to do so as protests increase & tensions rise.  Protestors carried long guns (rifles & shotguns) in marches on Saturday.

I thank the republicans in congress for making this situation not only possible but likely to escalate.  Their actions (or inactions) have pushed the situation to this prescipice:  Their adament refusal to do anything about gun control have armed the protesters.  Doing nothing in recent weeks except a political witch hunt of Hillary Clinton leaves there no establishment leadership to respond to citizen’s concerns, both black & white, and demonstrates to blacks that their lives are no concern of theirs.

Many may say that this isn’t that big a deal.  Eventually everyone will give up their protests & return to their daily lives.  I’m sure the same was said in the colonies in the 1760’s.  It’s not easy to recognize a rebellion until it’s too late to avoid it. Pray that we can learn that lesson from previous rebellions & respond in time to avoid this one.  Because armed rebellion affects everyone – even folks living in their nice safe homes in gated communities.  they won’t have to turn on the TV to see innocent bystanders getting shot and trampled while protesters & establishment forces battle it out.

The difference between courage & desperation

This week while chatting with my therapist, she repeatedly tried to compliment my courage in facing several challenges. But she & I had different perspectives of the same situations. Where she saw courage, I knew it was only desperation.   I finally got my point across using the classic 80’s movie “Officer and a Gentleman” where Richard Gere’s character is being harassed by his drill instructor to drop out. He breaks down, crying out “I’ve got no place else to go.  This is it!”  I’ve felt that way several times since the stroke- I have to be able to eat. I have to get up & stand on my own.  I have to be able to walk around the house.  I have to be able to put my brace & shoes on.  I have no place else to go.  This is it!  So I have to do whatever’s necessary to be able to do these things.  It’s not a matter of courage but of desperation.  The alternative is too scary to even think about.

Heroes are all around us

They just aren’t obvious.  They don’t look any different from everyone else.  And they come in all shapes and sizes.

My youngest daughter left today on a band trip to Disneyland.  I’m a little worried about her.  She’s been dealing with this bizarre nerve condition called Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome for the last 6 months, since she was in a car accident.  The accident wasn’t that severe in her mini-van but the whiplash she experienced triggered something in her shoulder and now the nerve is sending pain signals to the brain even when there isn’t any cause (beyond the signal which is the actual pain.)

So, I texted her some fatherly advice for when she’s away.  One of the things I said was that “there are heroes all around us.  They just aren’t obvious.”   They don’t look any different from anyone else.  My daughter Julia is a hero to me for the way she has endured the constant pain of CRPS and continued her normal life as much as possible, including captain of her school’s “Battle of the Books” team (it’s a reading geek thing) and playing oboe in band (hence the Disneyland trip.) And during it all, she’s not lost her patience with others like her sister or whined about how unfair her life is.

I wish there was some way we could give some recognition to the everyday heroes who are all around us. They deserve our admiration. Maybe if you and I looked a little deeper at others we encounter, we might discover more everyday heroes.

Thought for 3-13-15

“You play the game in front of you.” Hugh, explaining coming to terms with being responsible for his much younger half-brother and sister in Just Not Mine by Rosalind James.

Sports can be a very good metaphor for life and this quote is a great way to say that life doesn’t always go the way you expect.  So, even if you’ve got a great game plan and you’ve trained as much as possible and scouted your opponent, unexpected things may come up and you just have to accept them and keep on playing.

 

The significance of the pickle…

The First Presidency’s message for February was written by President Eyring about how conversion is much more than having a testimony.  To teach from this message, he referenced a General Conference talk Elder Bednar gave that used the “parable of the pickle” to teach that conversion is a  long process requiring full immersion in the gospel to be successful.

Much like you have to carefully clean and prepare a cucumber and then completely immerse it in the salt rind to pickle it, we have to be cleaned and prepared and then filly immersed in the gospel to attain successful conversion.  We can’t just go to church on Sundays and follow the commandments and expect to become Christ-like.  We must fully dive into the gospel and make it every part of our life.  That’s when conversion happens.

A sigh of relief all across the internet…

If I understand the reports correctly, the FCC voted on Thursday that broadband ISPs were common carriers that could be regulated using Title II.  The importance of this decision can’t be overstated.  The internet is what it is today because it has been left alone to grow independent from governmental or commercial regulation or interference.

If ISPs were allowed to use their captive markets to monetize delivery of content, it would have harmed not just the customers of the ISPs but the entire ecosystem of the internet.  The internet is probably the purest example we have ever had of a truly market driven economy anywhere and anywhen.  The success of any idea is determined directly by consumers.

While Thursday’s decision by the FCC is reassuring, the internet faces other threats which we have to continue to be vigilant for.  The growth and success of the recent Arab Spring movement is directly connected to the internet.  But other governments continue to try to manipulate the internet to further their own interests; most significantly, the governments of China, the US and North Korea have attacked internet users and continue to do so.  We need to rebuff the efforts of these governments and protect this valuable global resource.